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Pinpointing air pollution from space

For the first time, air pollution from individual cities and built-up areas can be detected from space. The European Sentinel-5 Precursor Earth observation satellite sends ultra precise measurement data to ground stations in Norway and Canada. R&E networks forward the data to processing facilities, thus contributing to meeting near-real-time requirements.

Grow food, grow jobs: how broadband can boost farming in California’s Central Valley

Broadband helps farmers and students in California’s Central Valley use technology and develop skills to improve the agriculture economy.

Singapore and Sapporo scenic sites come to life via R&E network link

In February 2018 spectators in Singapore were enchanted by crystal clear video images of the Sapporo Snow Festival in Japan whilst viewers in Japan could remotely take in the beauty of Singapore's iconic Botanic Gardens: long-distance cultural exchange powered by cutting-edge video technology and high-speed R&E network links.

How science engagers fight the ”Sneaker Net”

Many scientists are still moving hard drives or USB flash drives around although they don’t need to. They have a high-speed Research & Education Network at their service, but they are not taking full advantage of the networking resources available to them. This is where the Science Engager comes in.

High-speed drug discovery

How do you screen billions of drug compounds to find the right one? Connect a research team at the University of Alberta with a supercomputer 2,700 km away in Ontario using Canada’s high-speed national research and education network. Leveraging this powerful infrastructure, Dr. Michael Houghton and colleagues are speeding up the time it takes for life-saving drugs to be identified from months or years to weeks.

American Presidents in an interactive classroom

The President of the United States of America is said to be the most powerful person in the world. To understand past presidencies, you want to get as close as possible to key presidential decisions. You need access to primary sources, and that is exactly what The Presidential Primary Sources Project is doing.

US schools and libraries embrace LOLA

LOLA is an open source, low latency audio and video conferencing technology that enables real-time, simultaneous, live musical performances across long distances. LOLA is emerging as an opportunity for schools and libraries to leverage their advanced high speed connectivity to allow students to greatly expand their musical horizons.

Taking flight: a high-tech approach to studying birds

To encourage national and international collaboration, the Motus web portal will make data summaries and visualizations of bird migration tracking data, captured by the small Motus radio transmitters affixed to individual birds, publicly available for education and citizen science purposes.

Revealing the inner workings of a tornado

Leigh Orf from the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads a group of researchers specialised in re-creating meteorological events leading up to the forming of tornadoes. Built on real-world observational data, the computer simulations unveil the inner workings of these monstrous events in unprecedented detail.

Protecting the Earth from hazardous asteroids

On 19 April 2017 the 'Rock' asteroid made an uncomfortably close pass to Earth - the closest in 400 years. The first step to protecting against such hazards is to monitor them to calculate their precise orbits; this requires fast, reliable internet connections so that the huge volumes of observation data involved can be sent speedily and reliably to researchers around the world for analysis.

Making strides towards on-demand genetics data

Today’s scientists are riding an unprecedented wave of discovery, but the immensity of the data needed to facilitate many of these breakthroughs is creating internet roadblocks that are becoming increasingly detrimental to research. With an eye to the future, Clemson University researchers are playing a leading role in developing state-of-the-art methods to transfer these enormous data sets.

Taking astronomy to the cloud

Astronomy has come a long way from the days of Galileo Galilei looking through a telescope to the skies. Major science infrastructures such as the Hubble Space Telescope and telescope arrays, including the forthcoming Square Kilometer Array, create huge amounts of research data for scientists across the world to explore and explain the cosmos.